Decipha Morrissette: Spreading the Fame of God’s Name

This article was originally posted at my site. I’m married with three children, an SBC pastor, a PhD student at SBTS, and an average Southern Baptist. I’ve authored two books. You can connect with me on Twitter, Facebook, Google+, and YouTube.

Decipha Morrissette is a Christian Hip-Hop artist who seeks to spread the fame of God’s name everywhere he goes. He is an excellent artist with a 2000 year old message. His lyrics confront his hearers with their sin and the only cure for the sin disease: redemption by God’s grace alone through faith alone in Christ alone. Consider his answers to these six questions, and ask, “How can I help Decipha fulfill the ministry to which God has called him?”

Tell us about your life growing up, how you came to Christ, and how you developed as an artist. Where did Decipha come from?

 

I grew up in a military household; moved around a lot. My mother never married my father. She married my step dad in 1994; he was a preacher at the time. I made a confession of faith in Germany at a church that invited people up to the altar. I was six at the time and understood that I needed to be good and well behaved and not lie cheat or steal, in order to go to heaven, based on the fact that Jesus died for my sins. Over time, and through my step dad, I began to develop a relationship with the Lord. I believe God had saved me then, despite my ignorance and palagianistic attitude towards his sovereignty. But it wasn’t until the summer of 1999 when I was 12 going on 13, that I first heard the Crossmovement. I would say that it was at that time I heard the Gospel in a clear way. After that day I began to take studying the bible even more serious. I followed Crossmovement for a long time, and even downloaded their lyrics to study them. I began to look up the history of Christianity and compare it to other religions. It was through that study that I was convinced how different and even more credible Christianity really was. After moving to Atlanta I joined Bishop Eddie Long’s church and attended Creflo Dollar’s youth group. On Sunday mornings I was at a church that was an extension to Eddie Long. Yet, it wasn’t until I moved from Atlanta to Chicago and began to learn about the Great Commission and discipleship through men like Json, Brian Dye, Lecrae, and Flame that I began to grow and mature and understand the difference between the Gospel, as appose to the junk I moved away from.

 

Rap has been a part of my life since ’99. I have had the privilege of being a part of the good and bad of it. The type of Hip Hop I do is one that exposes and uncovers truths, while at the same time urging my listeners to study and discover for themselves about the God I am rapping about.

 

The name Decipha came to me in a dream after I was praying about what I should call myself, and what would best describe who I am and how I display the Gospel.

 

 

Who have been the biggest influencers in your life artistically, theologically, etc?

 

My biggest influencers have been people like Odd Thomas from Humble Beast, Brian dye from Legacy Movement, and Kareem Manuel; basically folks that have told me the truth and have stood on the Gospel. I am heavily influenced by mainstream hip hop, folks like Jcole, Don Trip, Ludacris, Eminem, Twista, Busta Rhymes, Kendrick Lamar, Jay-Z, etc.; they are simply great artists in my opinion who have been blessed by God with tremendous talent. I look at them and I know there is a gracious God. The fact that he allows them to continue to breathe after trampling over the gifts he has gave them. I love reading and listening to RC Sproul, Paul Washer, and John Piper. I read a lot of BB Warfield, John Owen, John Flavel, and Henry Scougal.

 

 

How does someone participate in hip-hop culture and music without leaving their Christianity behind?

 

Hip Hop is a sub-culture that is in need of the Gospel just like the Latino Culture or white collar America. For one to be a part is not hard if your aim is to preach the Gospel. You have to find your identity in the Gospel, and base everything you do out of the Gospel. Some people desire to be in the Hip Hop culture simply because it’s the flavor of the month. But If God is not tugging at your heart to disciple people in the Hip Hop culture, it’s probably not a good idea to try and look and act like them. You do not have to act like something you are not to evangelize anyone else. Yet, folks still think they have to pretend to be from the hood to reach those guys. Hip Hop, just like any other culture, needs to bow to Christ, repenting and believing in the Gospel, as well. A person like me found my voice in Hip Hop as a kid, and it connected with me for reasons I DO NOT KNOW. It is by the grace of God He has allowed me the opportunities to deliver his message to this people group. Therefore, leaving your Christianity behind should never be the case if God is the one calling you to a place.

 

 

What are some of your goals in Christian ministry, whether rapping or serving on staff at Legacy Fellowship Church and Children’s Hunger Fund?

 

In Christian ministry my goals are to spread the fame of God’s name where ever I go, to deliver his word to whomever. My goal within music is to make incredible art that glorifies God. My goals within Legacy is to preach the Gospel and raise up disciples in all 77 communities of Chicago, not just the neighborhoods where it’s safe. At Children’s Hunger Fund we are committed to partnering with Churches by supplying them with free food in order to preach the Gospel within their communities. Please look us up at Children’s Hunger Fund.

 

 

What past projects in Christian hip-hop have you most enjoyed, and what current projects are you working on? What are your future plans?

 

I love Kareem Manuel’s albums. I cannot wait for his next one. I am currently working on a Free Album entitled “Analytics,” examining specific aspects of life and basing those aspects on the Gospel.

 

 

How can pastors and youth pastors partner with you in ministry? Are you available for speaking and/or rapping engagements? If so, how can ministers contact you?

 

I am more than available for engagements; you can find me on Decipha Music or email me at info@deciphamusic.com. I am looking to connect with churches and organizations to do trainings, teachings, and performances.

 

 

I appreciate Decipha taking the time to answer these questions. I want to encourage you to check out his music and to consider having him come preach at your church or perform in your community. Not only is he excellent at his craft, his lyrics are theologically solid. He’s indeed “spreading the fame of God’s name” everywhere he goes. This is your opportunity to host an up and coming Christian hip-hop artist who will probably be difficult to get in a few years due to such high demand.

What are your thoughts?

This article was originally posted at my site. I’m married with three children, an SBC pastor, a PhD student at SBTS, and an average Southern Baptist. I’ve authored two books. You can connect with me on Twitter, Facebook, Google+, and YouTube.

Comments

  1. says

    OK< this is just a paragraph for the record books! ;-)
    " I am heavily influenced by mainstream hip hop, folks like Jcole, Don Trip, Ludacris, Eminem, Twista, Busta Rhymes, Kendrick Lamar, Jay-Z, etc.; they are simply great artists in my opinion who have been blessed by God with tremendous talent. I look at them and I know there is a gracious God. The fact that he allows them to continue to breathe after trampling over the gifts he has gave them. I love reading and listening to RC Sproul, Paul Washer, and John Piper. I read a lot of BB Warfield, John Owen, John Flaval, and Henry Scougal."

  2. says

    I know there are many Christians outside the culture of this art that don’t appreciate it, but I see that more and more are seeing the value of hip-hop, especially with the rise in visibility of artists such as Decipha, Shai Linne, LeCrae and Voice. Many of their pieces contain theology that rival that of the great hymns. The style is simply conducive for that. Just remember, once upon a time the old hymns we knew today were the new style and as hated by some then as rap is hated by some today. But it doesn’t matter if the style is old or new; all that matters is that what it says about God is true.