Not What, Ask Why!

I have grown up mostly in the 80s and 90s, and during those time periods, there has been a shift in the way examination and beliefs have processed. In the baby boomer generation, the question was “what should we do”? In my generation, Gen X and Gen Y, the question is not so much of how, but why? Why do we do things, what is the purpose and what is the point? Are we doing something that is worth while, is this worth our time and effort? This is a departure from the philosophy of our baby boomer parents, who told us what to do, but the question of why was usually answered with “because I said so”. This wasn’t enough for us then, and it’s certainly not enough for us today. In the realm of theology and the exploration of God’s word, the question is not so much of “what” but of “why”? God is moving, calling us to follow and there are things we should do and should not do, but why?

There are many things about God’s rules and laws that we take for granted, like the Ten Commandments or the Beatitudes that tell us how we should behave. These are clear commandments, and like the Great Commission, we need to follow them, but have we ever stopped to ask why? Have we stopped to ask why God gives us things to do and things not to do? I believe that God encourages us and pushes us to ask the question why. The reason I believe is simple, God calls us to obedience to have a deeper, more intimate and fulfilling relationship with Him. This is the purpose of the commandments, for the Great Commission, for the wisdom of Paul and Peter, James and John, the writings of the Old and New Testament all exist for this one principle, that we can know and love God more and have a deeper relationship with Him.

The purpose of any theological system should not be to understand what God does, but who God is and why God is doing what He is doing. We should not approach God as a distant school master, who exists to keep us in line. Instead, we should approach God as loving father, who desires a deeper relationship with us. His desire is that we would live a fulfilling life, filled with love and joy and peace. We can find these things in our Heavenly Father, regardless of the turmoil of life, the difficult situations and the trials and temptations. The why to our what is this, that we would find all that we need in our Father.

This should change the way we approach God, the Bible and the rules and commands He gave us. They are not rules to keep us from life, but guidelines to make sure we have a full and substantial life. These truths that God gives us will free us from the bonds of sin, from the chains of error and the shackles that so often come with all disobedience. God will set us free if we will be open to be set free. God will give us life if we are just willing to live it. God wants to have a deeper relationship with us, and He longs to reveal more and more of His nature and character. In this, or any theological exercise, our goal should be to know God, love Him more and share what we have found with others. My prayer in this is that we will discover the depths of truth in His love and the freedom of His grace, as well as His commands.

Much of the on going debate in Theological systems comes from the question of “what is the process, what should we do”? We have been so focused on trying to understand the process that we have almost neglected the purpose of the very thing we are seeking to study and understand, that is the work of Christ in the power of His salvation to bring people to reconciliation with God.

What we have done is looked at two paths that both lead to the same place, to the power of God in salvation. One road is that of human choice, seeking God and crying out to Him. The other road is that of God extending grace to sinners and calling those He has chosen and predestined. Both paths go the same direction and both lead to the same destination. From an eternal view, the paths are one in the same. From a Theological view, the paths are different, but the destination is the same.

The purpose of the journey, however, is what I want to focus on and to look at the journey, we have to overlap the paths. Which ever path you choose to walk down, the purpose God has is this: for you to grow in relationship to the Father, to fall in love with Christ, to be filled with the Spirit and build a strong and healthy community with other believers. The works, prepared for us, have this as a result. We are involved with God to do each of these things.

We know God is at work in our world, that He never sleeps and He is always vigilant. We also know that God is working in His people and through His people. God left His people, the church, on earth to do the works prepared for them. In working with God, we see the power of God and we learn and grow to understand His character. As we reach out to the lost, to the dying world we are able to radiate the love of God. By being these conduits and vessels of God, we learn more and more about the nature of the Father. The more we know God, the more we will grow in love of God. Our relationship will continue to deepen and grow. He invites us to join Him where He is working, we learned this from Henry Blackaby and his Experiencing God material. God wants us to join Him so we can grow into relationship with Him, and it makes sense. I have learned a great deal about the people I work with by working with them. I can see their strengths and weaknesses, their ups and downs. Working side by side with someone reveals a great deal about their character. God wants us to know His character, so He works with us, in us and through us.

God works with us and tells us to work with each other. The church should be a mobilized work force, doing God’s work. When we join God at work together, we build a strong community, and that community in turn creates a healthy place for people to connect. New believers join and begin to work with us, learning about us, learning about God. Every educator knows that experience is the best teacher, that everyone learns best by doing, and hands on is the best classroom. You want people to be discipled, work with them.

Many of our theological questions are answered through working with God. Do you want to know how Salvation works, how it happens? Stop arguing over the theological systems and remember your salvation experience. Share with others and see how they experience God. What happens? How is God at work, and how are the people responding, acting and behaving? What does a genuine salvation experience look like when all the pieces are in place? What does it look like when a spirit filled believer shares Christ with the fertile soil and produces a harvest? That is what theology needs to be, field research. We can argue back and forth about how God does things in the classrooms and board rooms, but in the mission field, God will simply show us. The word comes alive, we hide it in our hearts and then we open up our hearts.

Stop asking the simple questions, stop looking for the simple “what do we do” and start asking “why does this matter” because when we look at how it matters, it changes everything. When we look at how the Theology of Salvation works in the lives of your neighbor, your friend, your coworker, it matters. When it becomes more than just a sighed confession or document or creed and becomes a way of life. That is what Wovenism is about, how do I, a simple man become a conduit of the Immortal, All Powerful, All Knowing God of the Universe who holds all of creation in His hand? I say yes to the invitation, I step out and faith and I do the work that was prepared for me from a time before time and I go. I ask myself “why does it matter” and I look the person in the eyes and I say, “you, you are why it matters”.

Comments

  1. says

    I got sidetracked early when you said: “The purpose of any theological system should not be to understand what God does…”
    Yeah, that’s wrong. IF you put an “only” in there after the infinitive I’m good.
    Still reading and contemplating.

  2. says

    for some reason this reminded me of a song:
    ……………………..
    Well, the Lord said, “Let there be,” and there was on the earth below and in the sky above,
    Well, then he knocked off work ’cause it was Friday night,
    Come Saturday morning, everything was just alright, sure enough,
    Well, the Lord said, “Let man choose,” and man did,
    Well, there’s been sorrow and trouble in the world ever since,
    But there’s hope for us still – in the word God says, if we just be smart enough to just say yes – smart enough to say yes to him,
    And say it…

    Alright-ok-uh-huh-amen,
    Say it…
    Alright-ok-uh-huh-amen,
    As it was in the beginning, it will be until the end,
    Say it…
    Alright-ok-uh-huh-amen.

    Alright-ok-uh-huh-amen,
    You can argue with your maker or know the joy of saying yes to…to him (let me hear you say)
    Alright-ok-uh-huh-amen, (oh yeah)
    Say it…
    Alright-ok-uh-huh-amen

  3. andy says

    Really good reminders nor to put our system above knowledge of God through Jesus Christ. Probably may favorite post of yours to date. I don’t know what it has to do with wovenism, But really good otherwise.

  4. Jerry Smith says

    I recently came across a quote, don’t know who made it, that says a truth about all of us, “We use liberty as an excuse not to die daily for Christ.”

    There’s way to many theological systems that has been invented by man & many of them have nothing to with God’s truth. Those we should have nothing to do with while standing against them standing only in God’s truths. If your not in God’s true theological systems your worship is not accepted & you cannot please God, Matthew 15:9.

  5. andy says

    “If your not in God’s true theological systems your worship is not accepted & you cannot please God.”

    Could you clarify what you mean by this statement? Because on its face I have 2 reactions:

    1. Those with true or false beliefs about God cannot please him apart from Christ. Our righteousness is as filthy rags. It is Christ who makes our worship acceptable to God.

    2. We all likely have some deficiencies in our view of God and Theology, and for those issues that are not absolutely essential to the Gospel, I would say they fall under “where sin abounds, grace does much more abound.”

    • says

      A favorite quote from Rick Presley back on the SBC Impact blog:

      ‘Another humbling experience for me was to observe a conversation between a die-hard and someone who was more sensible about his beliefs. The die-hard asked, “Are you suggesting that we can fellowship with brethren who are in error?” to which the interlocutor replied, “I know of no other kind.”’

    • says

      Sometimes asking why is a check on whether or not you’ve actually understood the what correctly, and the search for why can bring up things that make you understand the what better. You can’t demand that God give you a why, but the search for it can at times be fruitful.

      There’s a difference between the “Why??!” that seeks for an excuse to get out of the what, and the “Why?” that seeks to know the what better.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>